NewsPress ReleasesRaces & Results

Stybar Survives, Attacks to Win Uphill Le Havre Finale – 102nd Tour de France, Stage 6

Tour de France 2015/Stage 6

Stybar Claims Another For Etixx – Quick-Step; Martin Injured, Retains Yellow

Etixx – Quick-Step rider Zdenek Stybar launched very early on the last slopes of a punchy Le Havre finale for 191.5km Stage 6. The gamble paid off, as Stybar won for the first time in his career, in his first participation, at Le Tour de France on Thursday.

Peter Sagan (Tinkoff-Saxo) finished 2nd. Bryan Coquard (Europcar) was 3rd. The peloton finished 2″ down on the Czech rider.

However, the finale was not all good news for Etixx – Quick-Step. Yellow jersey wearer Tony Martin was caught in a crash inside 1km to go, and had to cross with a new bike. Four Etixx – Quick-Step teammates rode with the German rider, and race leader, across the finish line.

The race came back together with 3km to go after Kenneth Vanbilsen (Cofidis) went solo out of an original breakaway with 12.6km left to race.

The breakaway had more than an 11 minute advantage early on in the race.

Etixx – Quick-Step looks next to Stage 7, from Livarot to Fougères, on Friday. The 7th Stage again has a slightly uphill into the finish, and while the stage could end in a group arrival, this might be a chance for a breakaway to make it to the line. This stage wraps up a period of several chances for the sprinters.

“The last 10 kilometers were really crazy,” Stybar said. “We had really great information from the team car. But still, to make that information real is not really easy. I saw Tony was in front with Mark Renshaw and Cav. I was behind Kwiato. But in the turns on the downhill, we lost too many positions. So I thought I could make it to the front to help Cav. Then when I got to the front, and Renshaw swung off. Tony was up with Cav, so I thought ‘OK, he is safe.’ I then rode to bring Cav to the front, but saw he was in a bit of difficulty. In that moment I was in the wheel of Van Avermaet, Sagan, and Kristoff. I also saw that they didn’t have any helpers left. So I thought if I go now, the one who will close the first gap to me will lose the sprint, so maybe no one will chase. So I gave it all or nothing as we decided with the team. It was really great to make it. I think this is on the level as my first cyclocross world championship in Tabor. It was an amazing feeling then and I feel the same as I did there. Right now I have an amazing feeling. I don’t really get it yet that I have won stage of le Tour de France. For this is a very important win on a personal level. My wife Ine is home with my newborn son, Lewis. I only got to see him for a few days and then I had to leave for Le Tour. I want to dedicate this victory to them. Also, this is special for me in terms of my development as a road rider. When I changed from cyclocross to road I had a difficult time adjusting. I was working really hard to make the transition. I made some nice results, such as Strade Bianche, and winning Eneco Tour 2nd Stage. But also I had a lot of bad luck with my two crashes. One at Eneco, and another in Ardooie for cyclocross. So this means a lot for me. I am extremely happy I got the chance from the team. They gave me the free card to do it. If I can do it, I could go for it. It means a lot because I don’t get a lot of chances in a year. Today I had one and I am very happy I made it. At the same time it is bittersweet. I feel very sorry for Tony. For Tony it must be crazy because he lost the TT, which was what he was focusing on, by a few seconds. Then he had two stages where he was just seconds short of the yellow jersey. Then he took it on a stage where he probably didn’t expect to take it, and he won solo. Then today, he crashed. So for him, personally, it must be crazy. But as I have seen here, it’s Le Tour de France. You never know what can happen around each corner. I feel terrible for him and can only hope the best for him, as does the entire team.”

Cycling: 102nd Tour de France / Stage 6  Podium / STYBAR Zdenek (CZE)/ Celebration Joie Vreugde /  Abbeville - Le Havre (191,5km)/  Ronde van Frankrijk TDF / Etape Rit /©Tim De Waele
Cycling: 102nd Tour de France / Stage 6
Podium / STYBAR Zdenek (CZE)/ Celebration Joie Vreugde /
Abbeville – Le Havre (191,5km)/
Ronde van Frankrijk TDF / Etape Rit /©Tim De Waele

Results – Stage 6: Abbeville – Le Havre (191.5 km)
1. Zdenek Stybar (Etixx – Quick-Step) – 4:53:46
2. Peter Sagan (Tinkoff-Saxo) – 0:00:02
3. Bryan Coquard (Team Europcar)

General Classification After Stage 6
1. Tony Martin (Etixx – Quick-Step) – 22:13:14
2. Christopher Froome (Team Sky) – 0:00:12
3. Tejay Van Garderen (BMC Racing Team) – 0:00:25
4. Peter Sagan (Tinkoff-Saxo) – 0:00:27
5. Tony Gallopin (Lotto Soudal) – 0:00:38
6. Greg Van Avermaet (BMC Racing Team) – 0:00:40
7. Rigoberto Uran (Etixx – Quick-Step) – 0:00:46
8. Alberto Contador (Tinkoff-Saxo) – 0:00:48
9. Zdenek Stybar (Etixx – Quick-Step) – 0:01:04
10. Geraint Thomas (Team Sky) – 0:01:15

Jersey Leaders After Stage 6
Maillot Jaune – Tony Martin (Etixx – Quick-Step)
Maillot Vert – André Greipel (Lotto Soudal)
Maillot á Pois Rouges – Daniel Teklehaimanot (MTN – Qhubeka)
Maillot Blanc – Peter Sagan (Tinkoff-Saxo)
Best Team – BMC Racing Team

Next: Stage 7: Livarot – Fougeres (190.5 km)

PROFIL7

Photos: Etixx – Quick-Step/Tim De Waele

Lenny B
Leonard Basobas - Among my many and varied interests are cycling and writing. I am deeply passionate about both. Strangely enough, neither has come very easy to me.I had such a horrible crash as a small child that I did not attempt to ride again until the 6th grade. From that point forward, you could say that I have had a love affair with two-wheels. When I was not out on my bike, I could be found tearing apart or putting back together other bikes. The frames and parts found in my parents’ basement today are a testament to that fact. Around the same time that I began riding again, a young rider named Greg Lemond had just won the U23 World Championships. Following his career was my entry point into the sport of cycling, but I never participated in organized racing until I was past my cycling prime. Today, a healthy curiosity about racing has me lining up on the road and in the nearest velodrome.In regard to writing, I am not a trained journalist. My writing, instead, strikes a creative bent in the form of short stories, at least when I not writing for my day job in clinical research. Although I have yet to be published for my creative writing, I have authored several abstracts and papers, and been published as the lead author for a paper in a well-known peer reviewed medical journal.I have covered the sport of cycling, as both writer and photographer, at such races as the Amgen Tour of California (2008 to 2014) and the US Pro Cycling Challenge. I was also the featured Guest Contributor for LIVESTRONG.com, commentating and moderating the site's live blogging feed during the 2009 Tour de France.